Painting

Meet me at the MoMA

The MoMA’s Alzheimer’s Project: Making Art Accessible to People with Dementia

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Ophelia Has A Dream

Cruising the internet, or what my beloved Grandma used to call the interset – I came across this exquisite video Orphelia Has A Dream by Miharayasuhiro and Paolo Roversi via an inspiring blog:  The Artful Blog. This magical, interactive film was apparently made in celebration of the Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde exhibition on show at Tate Britain

A brilliant in depth discussion of John Millais Everett’s original painting of Ophelia, which the contemporary version is clearly inspired by, can be seen at Khan Academy. The original painting is a scene deriving from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, in which Ophelia who apparently “loses her mind” when her father is murdered by her lover Hamlet, drowns herself in a stream. Shakespeare’s scene can be read here plus Ten things you never knew about Ophelia

Intentionally seeking out art that incorporates the human hand in some shape or form to inspire my research: Ophelia’s left hand in this contemporary version immediately captivated my attention. With her delicate palms turned upwards, seemingly in submission and in acceptance of her fate, before she drowns, floating in a ditch of flowers. I would be fascinated to hear the response and reaction of people who are living with dementia.  Some of the flowers, in the original painting, which include forget-me-nots, resonate as a powerful symbol of dementia.

Dementia Patients Find Their Memory Through Art – as in some museums in the UK which are becoming more and more dementia friendly i.e Royal Academy and National Portrait Gallery, it is now commonplace in cities across Germany to provide museum guided tours for people who are living with dementia – followed by a hands-on activity after interactive discussions of a specific theme of painting/s in the gallery.

“The fact that music can instantly evoke memories and emotions in those with dementia is well known. But that images can have a similar effect on the collective and personal memory is not as widely accepted” according to Andrea Kasiske.

“All that they take, colour, form, shape, and they process it in some way, that is real, and in the moment, and it translates in an Alzheimer person’s brain to have some meaning. The creative arts are an avenue to tap into a non verbal emotional place in a person. When they are given paint, markers, any kind of medium for art making and their hands are involved, and their muscles are involved, things are tapped in them that are genuine, and active and alive, so the creative arts bypass the limitations and they simply go to the strengths. People still have imaginations intact all the way to the very, very end of their progressive disease.” – Judy Holstein – Director CJE Senior Life Day Service Chicago from the film I Remember Better When I Paint

I Remember Better When I Paint

“This informative documentary offers pivotal new insights into the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease through creative arts. Leading international neurologists share findings which support the transformative power of drawing, painting, music and museum visits, illustrating how the parts of the brain related to emotions and creativity are largely spared by the disease, and therefore dramatically changing the way we look at Alzheimer’s and related disorders. The film shows how creative workshops are being embraced as exciting and effective therapy methods in several countries worldwide, opening doors of communication between those living with the disease and their caregivers and families.”

http://www.irememberbetterwhenipaint.com/